Know How People Hear You–So You Can Lead and Persuade

Tom Marcoux, Spoken Word Strategist, delivers a speech (in Thailand) about charisma and skills that effective leaders use.

“That went bad,” my new client, Marina, said.
“What bothered you the most?” I asked.
“I could see it. Many people in the audience disconnected,” she said.

This began a significant conversation.

I mentioned how people have different styles of hearing. Some people lean toward hearing the positive. The negative details bounce off them.
Other people want to “hear the bad news first.” They claim that they want the realistic view, and they can take it.

Here’s an example. When I speak on the topic of Darkest Secrets of Scaling, I help business owners face essential truths that assist them to expand and upgrade their businesses.

Tom Marcoux, the Communication Sage, coaches the audience to seize attention and persuade well. ( GetTheBigYES.com )

I reach the audience members in two ways.
I share the tough realities — what some may call the truths that bring up “negative” impressions.

The Darkest Secrets of Scaling:

1. You can lose all trust in a moment.
2. It’s easy to make people afraid to tell you the truth.
3. If you don’t have a reserve now, how can you handle more?

Secondly, I share related positive actions.

Positive Actions:

1. Communicate your actual trustworthiness.
2. Appreciate people who tell the truth.
3. Work daily to improve your reserve*.

* I speak of your reserve in terms of a “stored capacity” of calm, positive energy, and ability to perceive the overall situation. Your reserve helps you respond well to people and make excellent decisions.

During our coaching session, I guided Marina to develop her presentations and casual remarks that include both the “negative” and “positive” so people can hear her and understand the meaning of her material. This is how you can effectively lead and persuade people. You cover both the positive and the negative.

Do you speak in ways that reach people who lean toward the positive? And, do you have material that brings up relevant “negative” details for people who respond better to the tough realities?

As the Communication Sage and Spoken Word Strategist, I have seen my clients do well when they expand their “toolkit” of ways to communicate. When you talk about a tough reality, share positive actions that can be used to improve the situation. Even better, ask for responses of your audience about their ideas of actions that can contribute to improvements. Truly engage the listeners.

Tom Marcoux, the Spoken Word Strategist, coaches clients to develop new skills and see the evidence of their progress. ( GetTheBigYES.com )

How can you say your most important points in positive ways and also include tough-minded details that acknowledge real-world problems?

May these insights support your great moments.

Call to Action

To connect with your creativity and build for the future … Go deeper and take my online courses:

Darkest Secrets of Persuasion and Seduction Masters: How to Protect Yourself and Turn the Power to Good

Success Secrets: Confidence and Skills to Handle Toxic People

How You Can Believe in Yourself, Write and Complete Your Novel

How Lucky People Get Lucky—Secrets to Maximize Your Luck

Darkest Secrets of Film Directing: How Successful Directors Overcome Hidden Traps

Be Fearless with Your Home-based Business — Unleash Your Hidden Wealth

Darkest Secrets of Making a Pitch for Film and Television: How You Can Get a Studio Executive, Producer, Name Actor or Private Investor to Say YES to Your Project

Your Secret Charisma: More Confidence and More Sales


Tom Marcoux, Spoken Word Strategist and Executive Coach
CEO, International Speaker-Author of 50+ Books on Amazon,
including the book Convince Investors to Fund You: The Insider’s Guide to Avoid Deadly Mistakes and Gain Real Success with Your Startup Business

GetTheBigYES.com

Get your copy of Confident English: Proven Tactics for Extraordinary Career Success

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